Tag Archives for " Spare Tyres "

Spare Tyres

Tyre Myths: Everything You Need to Know About Spare Tyres

Spare Tyre Tips to Keep You Safe

A common misconception about spare tyres is that replacing a faulty tyre with a spare is like having a new tyre fitted. You don’t need to worry about replacing it, right? Well, that’s not the case. Driving on a spare tyre for any distance can do damage to your vehicle and is often unsafe.

What Are Spare Tyres For?

Spare tyres are designed as temporary solutions. Getting a flat tyre is always a pain. However, changing your tyre and driving to your destination is only the start of the story.

Your vehicle is probably equipped with a spare tyre to help you reach your destination. It is not meant to be driven on a long term. At the most, once you arrive at your destination you should take your vehicle to a garage to have your damaged tyre fixed or replaced.

How Long Can You Use A Spare Tyre For?

How long you can run your car on your spare tyre depends on what spare tyre your vehicle is equipped with. Older cars often come with a spare tyre that is the same as the tyres the vehicle was fitted within the factory.

However, car manufacturers noticed that spare tyres are only used infrequently. Some are never used. As vehicle owners rarely use their spare tyres, manufacturers decided that providing a full-sized spare is unnecessary. Nowadays, it is more usual to have a smaller spare tyre. This saves space and is lighter. Such spare tyres and spare tyre solutions recommend that you drive no further than approximately 80 kilometres before replacing with a new tyre.

How Fast Can You Drive on a Flat Tyre?

It is not recommended that you drive at an excessive speed when driving with a spare. Most tyre manufacturers will tell you not to exceed 80 kilometres per hour because:

  • Spare tyres have less durability: There is often little tread on a spare, increasing the chance of a second flat if you are going at fast speeds or long distances.
  • The tyre pressure can be incorrect: Spare tyres often sit for years in your car without being inspected. You may forget that it is there altogether until the time comes to use it. Not checking your spare tyre means that it is probably underinflated. The low PSI makes it less safe to drive.

What Can Cause a Flat Tyre?

Flat tyres aren’t that common, but chances are if you drive a vehicle you will experience at least once in your lifetime.

Here are some of the most common causes of flat tyres that you should look out for:

  • Sharp objects: The most common cause of a flat tyre is punctured by a sharp object.
  • Valve stem damage: Your valve stem is the small stem that protrudes from your tyre, which is used to inflate and deflate your tyres. If your valve stem is damaged, air can start to leak from your tyres.
  • Rubbed tyres: Worn treads and damaged sidewalls increases the chance of a blowout.
  • Overinflated tyres: Overinflated tyres create unsafe pressure, uneven wear, and possible blowout.

What Do the Experts Have to Say?

You should only use a spare tyre for an emergency. When needed, stick to the manufacturer’s recommendations, and never drive at speed or for excessive distances on a spare. Finally, as part of your tyre maintenance routine, don’t neglect your spare – you never know when it will be needed. As Bridgestone says:

Temporary spare tyres are designed to be, as the name suggests, temporary solutions. They do not provide the same amount of performance and durability as regular tyres and should not be treated as permanent replacements. We recommend you check the condition of your temporary spare tyre periodically as it, just like all tyres, will lose its air pressure over time.

Have you checked your spare tyre recently? Feel free to contact us to book an appointment or ask any questions you may have.

Keeping your family and fleet safe on the road,

Dean Wood

Spare Tyres

What spare tyre should you invest in?

Spare tyre tips for all drivers

A spare tyre is a spare tyre, right? Wrong. A spare tyre is a lifesaver. You carry a spare to get you out of trouble, should you suffer a puncture or tyre blowout on the road. With spare tyres, you might decide a space saver tyre is the best choice. But it’s not your only option.

There are several different types of spare tyres. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages. This article will help you decide which is best for you.

·      Full-size matching spare tyre

This is exactly what it says: a tyre that is the same as the tyres on your vehicle. Should you need to switch one of your tyres for the spare, it won’t look out of place. You won’t need to get to a tyre shop straight away to replace the spare. However, a full-size spare takes up more space than other spare tyre options.

If you have a full-size spare, you should include it in your tyre rotation regime. This will mean that when you make a full tyre change you should change five tyres and not four.

·      Full-size non-matching tyre

This is a full-size tyre that might not be on a matching wheel. You may be tempted to maintain a spare tyre that is a different size to your other tyres (within legal guidelines), though we don’t recommend this.

Like the full matching tyre, you won’t have to drive straight to a tyre shop. However, this type of spare also takes up more space in your vehicle and does nothing for aesthetics.

·      Full-size temporary spare tyre

This tyre has a shallow tread depth, and therefore a limited life as a replacement. You shouldn’t use it for anything other than emergency use, but if you do need to use it you won’t need to drive straight to a tyre shop.

A full-size temporary spare tyre should perform little differently to your other tyres, so your handling and grip is unaffected. Because they are lightweight, they are easier to handle. However, they will still take up the same amount of space as other full-size spares.

·      Compact spare tyre

This is also a lightweight tyre with a shallow tread. However, its smaller. Thus, it may be a good option for those with limited space to keep a spare in the vehicle. You’ll need to inflate it to a higher pressure, and you will also need to go to a tyre shop immediately. You should note that driving on this type of tyre could diminish driving features such as ABS braking and traction.

·      Collapsible spare tyre

This is the spare tyre that takes up the least space, so it may be a good choice if you drive a small car or have lots of luggage to carry. However, to use this type of tyre you will need to inflate it – usually with a canister. It is also only good for a limited mileage.

Tips to help you choose a spare tyre

How do you decide which tyre is best for you? Space, location and where you drive are the most important considerations. For example:

  • If you drive mostly around the city, you won’t be far from a tyre shop. So, you may decide on a lightweight, temporary spare.
  • If you plan to take a road trip across Australia or into the Outback, you’ll need a robust spare to ensure you can continue for what may be a hundred miles or more, or across rough terrain.

When buying a spare, you should ask advice from the tyre specialists at your tyre shop.

Tips for driving on a spare

You should check your spare tyre regularly, just as you do your other tyres. Make sure that it:

  • Is correctly inflated
  • Is not damaged in any way
  • Has a legal tread depth

When driving on a spare, you should drive more slowly. Some spares are not made to drive at speeds of more than 80 kilometres per hour. Remember that many spares are only for temporary use. You should get to a tyre shop as soon as possible.

If you are using a full-size spare, while you can drive further on it, you should remember that you now don’t have a fit spare tyre – so you shouldn’t delay repairing or replacing your damaged tyre.

If you need a spare tyre or have used one because of a puncture or blowout in Brisbane, contact Darra Tyres and bring your vehicle into out tyre shop for fitting by fully qualified and experienced tyre technicians.

Keeping your family and fleet safe on the road,

Kevin Wood

Spare-Tyre

Why you should check your spare tyre if it rains in Brisbane

When was the last time you checked your spare?

The weather here in Brisbane can bring calamitous conditions to roads. The seasonal storms we have in Brisbane are particularly dangerous for drivers, because of their effect on tyres. Slippery roads make handling more difficult and increase braking distances. Not surprisingly, there are more accidents in the rain and on wet roads than there are when the weather is dry.

Rain is also bad news for tyre life. When tyre rubber is wet, it is damaged more easily. This makes it more likely that you’ll suffer a puncture. This is especially true if your tread is near the minimum legal tyre tread depth. In fact, it has been estimated that the likelihood of a puncture is doubled if you only have 10% of useful tread remaining on your tyre.

When did you last check your spare tyre?

Your spare tyre may be the most important you have. If you do suffer a puncture, a well-maintained spare tyre will get you to the nearest tyre shop or back home. If it’s flat, it won’t. A flat tyre is about as much use as a chocolate teapot.

Most drivers we meet in our Darra Tyres shop have never checked their spare tyre. If your vehicle is more than five years old, it’s likely that your spare tyre won’t be much use to you. All tyres have a limited life, even if they aren’t used. You can read more in our blog, “How do you know how old your tyres are and if they need changing?

Our advice is to check your spare tyre at least once per month. Make sure that it is fully inflated and doesn’t have any debris in the tread. If one of your driving tyres is punctured, you’ll be pleased you took five minutes out of your busy life to make sure the spare is right.

What if you don’t have a spare tyre?

Some vehicles today don’t carry a spare. Instead, the manufacturer supplies a can of magic gunk to make an emergency repair. That’s all well and good until you suffer a real bad puncture. If you’ve been running your tyres flat, there’s a good chance that the sidewall will rip – especially in the wet.

That can of gunk isn’t going to fix a tyre with a bad puncture. You won’t be getting home until you’ve had the tyre replaced roadside – and that’s going to be more expensive than if you had been able to get to a tyre shop.

Prevention is better than cure

This is something my dad used to tell me all the time. It’s as true today as it was all those years ago. If you do what is necessary to prevent a catastrophe, then you won’t need to do what is necessary to recover from that catastrophe. Now, you may not think that a puncture is a catastrophe. Tell that to the driver who gets a puncture in torrential rain, spends 10 minutes getting the damaged tyre off, replaces it with the spare, and then finds the spare is flat when he takes the car jack off.

Here’s our advice to help avoid punctures when it’s wet (and when it isn’t):

  • Check your tyres once per week. Make sure they are free from debris and inflated to correct pressure.
  • If you notice any cuts, grazes, bulges or flat patches, take your tyre to a tyre shop to have it inspected.
  • Once per month, do the same check to your spare tyre.

Simple, isn’t it? A five-minute check once every week could save you from a whole heap of bother on the road. When you’re already late for that important meeting, or to collect your kids. In the middle of a storm that would make Noah nervous. When you forgot your coat.

Prevention is better than cure. If you spot signs of damage on your tyres, or if the tread is starting to wear thin, or you have uneven wear, bring your vehicle into our Darra Tyres shop today.

For all your tyre needs, contact Darra Tyres – we’ll see you right.

Keeping your family and fleet safe on the road,

Kevin Wood

>